Brit Plexi (Nrm, Brt, & Jump)

Based on the Marshall® Super Lead 100

About

(No Master)
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The stack four inputs, EL34 tubes Both the Normal and Bright inputs of this legendary Marshall® 100 watt beast. First produced in 1965 (note that the “1959 “ is a model number and does not indicate the date of manufacture) is often referred to as the “original” Plexi, featuring two channels and four inputs. It was utilized by Pete Towsend, Eric Clapton, and most famously, by Jimi Hendrix at his Woodstock performance.

Brit Plexi Nrm : The Normal channel, as you might expect, offers a flatter EQ response and a bit lower gain, well-suited for rhythm playing.

Brit Plexi Brt: The Bright channel features a boosted, brighter tone, which is ideal for a more cutting lead tone

Brit Plexi Jump: Normal channel + Bright channel jumped from imput.

Guitar playing is all about experimentation, isn’t it? That, and finding all the possible ways to get more distortion out of whatever gear you have at hand. One of the fun things you can do with a Plexi is take a short guitar cable and jumper channel I and channel II (as they’re frequently numbered) together for a little extra saturation. Some guys loved this sound so much that they pulled the chassis and permanently wired a jumper into the amp. Being the obsessive/compulsive tone freaks we are, we just had to give you the 

Plexi Jump  model to give you a sound based on of this setup.

Modeled after* the infamous ’68 Marshall® ‘Plexi’ Super Lead. By the time this amp was built (ca. 1968), Marshall® had completely changed the circuitry away from the Fender® 6L6 power tube heritage and moved to an EL34 tube. Another major tone difference was due to the necessary output & power supply transformer changes. All this mucking about added up to create a tone forever linked with Rock Guitar. Amps of this era didn’t have any sort of master volume control, so to get the sound you’d have to crank your Super Lead — just the thing to help you really make friends with the neighbors. Hendrix used Marshall®s of this era; a decade later Van Halen’s first two records owed their “brown sound” to a 100-watt Plexi (Our Super Lead, in fact, has the ‘lay down’ transformer that was unique to ’68 models, the same as Hendrix and Van Halen’s Marshalls®.). To get a crunch sound out of a Plexi, you would likely crank the input volume and tone controls. You’ll find that, in keeping with our “make-it-sound-a-whole-lot-like-the-original” concept, this model is set up to do pretty darned near the same thing.

Tips:
Plexi is supposed to sound fizzy (it’s helps to cut through in a mix). Don’t be afraid to turn the bass all the way down or the treble all the way up. Just like with the actual amp. For example, on the normal channel of a Plexi most people turn the bass way down. Otherwise it’s too flubby.” Settings for a “typical” Plexi tone could be aprox. Bass: 2, Mid: 8, Treble 7.5. Presence adjust to taste.

Reference Videos

Room full stack

Jumped